Online Exhibits@Yale

Browse Exhibits (11 total)

“Tomorrow’s Overture is Always Best”: The Music of Kay Swift

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“Tomorrow’s overture is always best, no codas for me—I’m a no-stalgia gal.” —Kay Swift, 1975 Reflecting on her lack of "no-stalgia" at age 78, composer Kay Swift (1897–1993) aptly summarized a long and prolific career in music. In addition to being the first woman to compose the complete score of a successful Broadway musical (Fine and Dandy—1930), Swift wrote music for one of George Balanchine’s first American ballets (Alma Mater—1934), served as a staff composer at Radio City Music Hall, and continued to compose works for stage, screen, and concert hall through to her... Read more

A Riff on Ruff: Yale’s Jazz Ambassador to the World

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Since June 2016, the Gilmore Music Library has been undergoing renovations, and our exhibit program has been on hold. With the inaugural exhibit in our brand-new display cases, we are delighted to honor the 85th birthday of Prof. Willie Ruff of the Yale School of Music. A world-class musician on two instruments (horn and bass), a multifaceted researcher, a well-connected impresario, and polyglot world traveler; a Yale alumnus and professor; and a long-time friend of the library, Ruff is truly one of a kind. The exhibit features a variety of items, including photographs, sound recordings,... Read more

Bringing Order Out of Chaos: A Century of Robert Shaw

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Robert Shaw (1916-1999) was the most renowned choral conductor of the 20th century, and a major orchestral conductor as well. He led the Collegiate Chorale and the Robert Shaw Chorale, served as George Szell’s assistant conductor at the Cleveland Orchestra, and was music director of the Atlanta Symphony. He would have turned 100 on April 30. Our exhibit features musical scores annotated by Shaw, correspondence with prominent persons as well as letters he wrote to his choruses, photographs of Shaw throughout his long career, and a variety of other items.

Ezra Laderman: In Memoriam

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Ezra Laderman (1924-2015) ranks among the leading American composers of his era. He served as Dean and Professor of Composition at the Yale School of Music, and also as the President of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the American Music Center, and the National Music Council. Our exhibit, which includes music, photographs, and other materials, draws upon the Ezra Laderman Papers as well as several items lent to us by the Laderman family. It is being held in conjunction with a memorial concert at the Yale School of Music on March 2.

Preaching to the Choir: American Jazz and Cold War Diplomacy in Southeast Asia

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During the Cold War, the U.S. State Department sponsored international concert tours by many prominent jazz musicians in the hopes of presenting an attractive image of American culture and values. Preaching to the Choir: American Jazz and Cold War Diplomacy in Southeast Asia focuses on Benny Goodman’s Asian concert tour in 1956-57. It uses photographs, correspondence, clippings, and other archival materials to show the interaction between music and diplomacy. This exhibit developed from a term paper that Eugene Lim ’18 wrote last year for Prof. Rebekah Ahrendt’s freshman... Read more

Organ Music Treasures from the Gilmore Music Library

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The Gilmore Music Library is home to a wealth of organ music, in manuscripts and early printed editions, ranging from J.S. Bach and his circle, to Yale composers such as Charles Ives and Paul Hindemith. This exhibition has been organized to coincide with the Northeast Regional Convention of the American Guild of Organists in New Haven.

Plays Well with Others: Duets in Instrumental Treatises

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The inclusion of duets in music method books has a long history. They are an integral part of learning to play any instrument, and this exhibit features examples from instrumental treatises through the ages for brass, woodwind, and stringed instruments.

Boundaries of Romanticism

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In Boundaries of Romanticism, we highlight composers who stand (chronologically or stylistically) near the beginning or the end of the Romantic era. These include Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Mahler, Richard Strauss, Rachmaninoff, and others. Each composer is represented by a musical manuscript, letter, or other item, such as an Austrian coin bearing Schubert’s likeness, or a program of a concert that Mahler conducted in Woolsey Hall.

Hot Spots: Highlights from the Jazz Collections in the Gilmore Music Library

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Most of the Gilmore Music Library's holdings come from the classical tradition, but we are also a world-renowned center of jazz research. The Library is the home of the papers of the "King of Swing," Benny Goodman, as well as numerous other jazz figures, such as Mel Powell, Eddie Sauter, Slam Stewart, Red Norvo, and John Hammond. It also holds individual manuscripts by Duke Ellington, Artie Shaw, Fats Waller, and Glenn Miller. Hot Spots features a selection of these treasures, along with photographs of jazz luminaries from the papers of Stanley Dance and Helen Oakley Dance and Fred... Read more

Master or Monster: Richard Wagner at 200

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In 2013 the world marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Richard Wagner, a pivotal figure in the history of western music. Wagner developed a new conception of opera, wrote about it at length, and then composed the librettos and music that put his theories into action. His works are still cornerstones of the operatic répertoire, and his stylistic and formal innovations influenced countless other composers. Wagner's musical genius and charismatic personality inspired cult-like devotion from his admirers, but his anti-Semitism and other character flaws made him many enemies as well, and he... Read more