Online Exhibits@Yale

Ongoing Impact of the Song

The World Tomorrow

Appearance in the magazine

The World Tomorrow, 1929

As the twentieth century went on, "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing" became widely known and was often cited as the Negro National Anthem.

Lincoln Menu Card

Lincoln Menu Postcard, 1930 front)

Lincoln Menu Postcard

Lincoln Menu Postcard, 1930 (back)

The song was frequently sung at events such as celebrations of Lincoln's birthday. 

Correspondence from James Weldon Johnson to Lisbon C. Berry

Correspondence from James Weldon Johnson to Mrs. Lisbon C. Berry (1933)

Correspondence from James Weldon Johnson to Captolia T. Dent

Correspondence from James Weldon Johnson to Captolia T. Dent (1932)

People often wrote James Weldon Johnson asking advice about how to sing the song. He responded often with specific instructions about, for example, dynamics (how loudly or softly to sing different parts of the song).

National Urban League Program, 1972

National Urban League Program, 1972

New York Urban League Program, 1973

New York Urban League Program, 1973

"Lift Ev'ry Voice" was often the opening or closing hymn for civic and other public events.

Photograph of Marian Anderson by Carl Van Vechten, 1940

Marian Anderson, 1940

'Lift Every Voice and Sing"  Dedicated to Miss Marian Anderson

Concert edition dedicated to Marian Anderson 

The song was performed by many popular musicians such as noted contralto Marian Anderson, one of the most celebrated singers of her era.

The song is still performed today by popular musicans of our time, such as BeyoncĂ©. 

Ongoing Impact of the Song