Online Exhibits@Yale

Re-engineering the Market - Section 3

The goal of any U.S. foreign aid package, Bowles admitted, was to work itself out of business. Without formal military agreements, Indian-American relations were predicated on a quid pro quo system. The moment at which India was able to sustainably produce food was the moment India no longer required extensive U.S. support.

When India is placed in the wider context of U.S. foreign policy in Asia, Bowles’ policy initiatives were successful. The United States supplied the food necessary to hedge against instability, and through its infrastructure projects gave India methods it could employ to continue to modernize.

Bowles stated that . . . “The primary purpose of American economic assistance may be summed up in the following terms: To enable competent, socially conscious nations such as India to respond quickly, constructively and responsibly to the forces which are shaping tomorrow’s world.” When comparing Indian-American relations with those of Vietnamese-American relations during the same time period, for example, it becomes clear that the United States, without relying on its military, was able to support nation building efforts. Such a success should be credited to Bowles’ rejection of traditional U.S. foreign policy initiatives.

Re-engineering the Market - Section 3