Online Exhibits@Yale

Restoration

The restoration of the nave has been made possible by a $20 million gift from Richard Gilder, Yale B.A. 1954, and his wife, Lois Chiles. Helpern Architects has worked with University administration and library staff in developing a new vision of how the nave will help the library move into the digital age.

 

All images courtesy of Helpern Architects

 

Architectural rendering of the view of the circulation desk in the Sterling Library Nave.

View of Circulation desk. The original circulation desk dated from a time when most users were not allowed into the bookstacks. The reconfigured desk will provide easy access to the stacks through openings at both ends, and a new self-service hub will feature self-checkout, a book-drop station, scanning machines, and direct access to books on hold.

Architectural rendering of the view of the south aisle in the Sterling Library Nave.

View of South Aisle. Removal of the card catalog extensions provides a large open space that will hold computer workstations, areas of soft seating, and tables for reading and study. The entire south wall of card catalog drawers will be retained as a reminder of the original purpose and architecture of the space. 

Architectural rendering of the view of the north aisle in the Sterling Library Nave.

View of North Aisle. Library services such as circulation, information, and privileges will be located in the north aisle of the nave. Spaces for consultation with library staff and for group study are also in this area. The windows of this aisle face the Selin Courtyard.

Nave floor plan.

Nave floor plan. 

Restoration