Online Exhibits@Yale

Browse Exhibits (23 total)

Deaf: Cultures and Communication, 1600 to the Present

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What is deafness? From a medical perspective, deafness is an audiological condition that might be resolved through hearing aids or cochlear implants. But from another perspective, to be Deaf (often spelled with a capital “D”) is to belong to a culture, with a shared language and identity. This exhibit explores how people have understood deaf communication and Deaf culture since the seventeenth century, with displays on the history of education, medical interventions, sign languages, and popular culture.

Not Reading in Early Modern England

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We think of skimming, scanning, and study aids as the particular intellectual malaise of the internet age, but early modern commentators also worried that tools to faciliate discontinuous reading might enable unacceptable laziness and failures of readerly attention. John Milton complained in 1644 of clergymen who composed sermons with the “infinit helps of interlinearies, breviaries, synopses, and other loitering gear.” Cribs and commonplace books, wrote John Selden in 1618, are "excellent instruments for the advancement of Ignorance and Lazinesse." Others were concerned that people... Read more

A Riff on Ruff: Yale’s Jazz Ambassador to the World

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Since June 2016, the Gilmore Music Library has been undergoing renovations, and our exhibit program has been on hold. With the inaugural exhibit in our brand-new display cases, we are delighted to honor the 85th birthday of Prof. Willie Ruff of the Yale School of Music. A world-class musician on two instruments (horn and bass), a multifaceted researcher, a well-connected impresario, and polyglot world traveler; a Yale alumnus and professor; and a long-time friend of the library, Ruff is truly one of a kind. The exhibit features a variety of items, including photographs, sound recordings,... Read more